On Photoblogging

General, Photography 4 Comments

So, you might ask, “why a photoblog, dria?” There are two answers to this, each with a number of layers. One is a relatively succinct answer. The other is (so far) three pages long. The three-pager only deals with photoblogging incidentally, but the subject of those three pages is actually more why I started a photoblog than the short answer. I’m just going to give the short answer today, because I’m not finished writing the long answer.

Here’s the short answer.

I have started a photoblog for the following reasons:

  1. I like photography a lot. I very much enjoy both taking and viewing photographs. I get a fundamental sense of satisfaction when I manage to take a decent photo, and I find viewing at other peoples’ photographs to be very rewarding. Photographs are akin to poems, in my mind, in that really good ones manage to capture a moment with an efficiency of composition that communicates volumes. I admire the craft behind these compositions, and I admire the discipline of the composers.
  2. I want to become a better photographer. The only way to become a better photographer is to practice photography. My photoblog is intended to be a catalyst, driving me to be more disciplined about my photography. Wanting to become a better photographer is, as they say, easier said than done (demonstrated by the fact that I’ve been saying it for years).
  3. I have been inspired by other photobloggers. In particular, daily dose of imagery (a brilliant Torontonian photoblogger), and chromasia. These guys are actually out there with their cameras almost every day. They demonstrate the sort of discipline I want.
  4. I want to justify purchasing a high-end Digital SLR camera before I run off and drop a few thousand dollars on one. I would really, really like to buy a Nikon D70s kit, a couple of additional lenses, and a big fat CF card. Right now I do not use the gear I have nearly enough (or nearly skillfully enough) to justify that. If I can maintain a photoblog for six or twelve months, posting new photos on a more-or-less daily basis, I’ll have a much better reason to engage in that sort of rampant consumerism.
  5. It will be fun.

Note: The photoblog RSS feed is still semi-broken. It validates, and it works fine in NNW, but Firefox and Safari both dislike it. Hrm.

Update: Photoblog feeds should work now. Thanks Vlad :)

4 Responses to “On Photoblogging”

  1. graydon Says:
    June 16th, 2005 at 12:30 pm

    often in arts (rather than business), you are focusing on improving your craft (rather than your product), so bad tools make you a better artist.

  2. dria Says:
    June 16th, 2005 at 1:05 pm

    This can be true, but in this particular case, there are things that DSLRs can do that my current camera can’t. I miss, so much, the basic camera features of manual focus rings and a depth-of-field preview button. Until I bought a digital camera, I never had autofocus. Now I have a camera that theoretically has manual focus, but I can’t seem to ever get the precision I want out of it. The result is that I end up using auto-focus 100% of the time, and, as a result, blowing about 30% of the photos I take because the stupid machine focused on the wrong thing.

    I just really miss my old manual cameras, but I also have zero interest in using regular film. It’s a frustrating little dichotomy right now.

  3. graydon Says:
    June 16th, 2005 at 12:30 pm

    often in arts (rather than business), you are focusing on improving your craft (rather than your product), so bad tools make you a better artist.

  4. dria Says:
    June 16th, 2005 at 1:05 pm

    This can be true, but in this particular case, there are things that DSLRs can do that my current camera can’t. I miss, so much, the basic camera features of manual focus rings and a depth-of-field preview button. Until I bought a digital camera, I never had autofocus. Now I have a camera that theoretically has manual focus, but I can’t seem to ever get the precision I want out of it. The result is that I end up using auto-focus 100% of the time, and, as a result, blowing about 30% of the photos I take because the stupid machine focused on the wrong thing.

    I just really miss my old manual cameras, but I also have zero interest in using regular film. It’s a frustrating little dichotomy right now.

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